The Regional Municipality Of York

    >>>

Health Sub Navigation

Actions
Loading...

Quitting Smoking

For most smokers, quitting smoking is the single best thing they can do to improve the length and quality of their lives. Some health benefits happen right away while others occur the longer you stay smoke-free. Begin by creating a personal plan.

Quitting smoking can be a difficult process.

  • On average, it takes five to seven tries before quitting for good
  • Every attempt increases the chances of success

Quitting is very personal. Not all people quit the same way and each attempt is different from the last. Visit Quit Stories to get advice from local people sharing why and how they gave up the habit for good.

What's New

Start your quit with Stop on the Road

York Region Public Health hosts the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health’s Smoking Treatment for Ontario Patients (STOP) on the Road program, which provides nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) at local community workshops for Ontarians who wish to quit smoking.

Public Health Nurses offer workshop participants five weeks of NRT patches at no cost and helpful information on quitting smoking. Pre-registration is required to make sure you are eligible and space is limited. Those interested in participating may call 1-877-464-9675 ext. 73052.

Upcoming workshop:

Date Time and Location
Monday, June 4, 2018
6 p.m. to 9 p.m. in Newmarket

To learn more about STOP on the Road and find workshops throughout Ontario, visit stopstudy.ca

quitting smoking,nicotine replacement therapy,workshops,smoking,cigarettes,stop smoking,nicotine dependence,help with quitting smoking The Regional Municipality of York en-US

Your Quit Smoking plan

Being prepared and making a personal quit plan will help you quit smoking for good.

Eight tips to making quitting easier

  1. Make a list

    List all the reasons why you want to quit and keep the list close by for when you are tempted to smoke. Think of your:

    • Family and friends
    • Health
    • Self-image
    • Social life
    • Money
  2. Understand your smoking behaviour

    Track your smoking behaviours over a few days using a simple chart. It’s a quick and easy way to recognize your smoking triggers.

    Your chart should include the number of cigarettes, time of day, what you were doing at the time and who you were with. Rate, from one to five, how badly you needed the cigarette, with five being really needed it, and why you were smoking.

  3. Find healthier substitutes for smoking

    Once you understand your smoking behaviours and why you smoke, you’ll be better able to recognize trigger situations ahead of time and choose something other than a cigarette. For example, take a walk, change your routine and get some fresh air.

  4. Change your environment and routine

    Making a few little changes can make it easier to quit. Cut back on caffeine because you may need less as you quit, eat breakfast in a different place and make your home and car smoke-free.

  5. Talk to someone

    By telling others that you are quitting smoking, you are more likely to try your best. Telling friends and family also gives them a chance to help you. Let your doctor or pharmacist know you are quitting smoking. They can provide support and may recommend adjustments or changes to medication you are taking as you quit.

  6. Learn from the past

    If you have tried to quit before, use that experience to make your next try a success.

    For example, you started smoking again because:

    • You could not handle the cravings
    • You constantly found yourself in situations that triggered smoking
    • You were with people who smoked
    • You felt you gained weight

    What could you do differently?

    • Talk with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist to help with your concerns
    • Consider stop smoking medications-they can double your chance of quitting
    • Tips one through four can help!
  7. Set a Quit date

    Pick a low-stress day in the next three weeks and mark it on your calendar. You’re much more likely to start your quit day if it’s written down.

  8. Motivate yourself with positive thoughts

    Think about the positive things about quitting and celebrate being smoke-free:

    • “I did not need to smoke when I was out with my friends”
    • “My car is cleaner now that it is smoke-free”

What if I have a set back?

If you have a set back and have a cigarette or two, it is okay. Remember, quitting is a process that often takes several tries and there are many ways to go about it. Research shows that the chances of quitting for good increases with every try.

Other quit smoking methods

There is no clear evidence that using herbal, laser or hypnosis therapies or e-cigarettes help to quit smoking. It is recommended to research these options before using them.

If you need help call

  • Smokers’ Helpline at 1-877-513-5333 or visit smokershelpline.ca
  • York Region Access York at 1-877-464-9675 TTY (for those with hearing disabilities) 1-866-512-6228
The Regional Municipality of York en-US

Medications can help

Quit smoking medications along with support and a quit plan can more than double your chances of quitting success. These medications help by reducing nicotine withdrawal and cravings, which can be intense and uncomfortable.

Before using any medication, talk with your health care provider especially if you are pregnant, breastfeeding, have angina, irregular heartbeat or had a recent heart attack or stroke. If you are on other medications, when you quit or cut down on smoking, the amount of medication you require may change.

Non-prescription medication (over the counter)

Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) is a form of medication that does not require a prescription and is sold at a pharmacy. Tobacco use causes serious health problems; NRT is a much safer option for getting nicotine without the other harmful chemicals found in tobacco. Nicotine Replacement Therapy can be used as long as needed with guidance from a health care provider.

Long acting NRT is a nicotine patch worn on the skin, provides a steady amount of nicotine throughout the day and is replaced every 24 hours. There are patches with different amounts of nicotine and the patch you wear will depend on how much you smoke per day. Ask your pharmacist about which patch is best for you. If you continue to experience episodes of nicotine withdrawal while on the patch, you can also use short acting NRT with guidance from your pharmacist or health care provider.

Common side effects of long acting NRT include skin irritation and sleep disturbance. Speak to your pharmacist to discuss ways to reduce these side effects.

Short acting NRT provides nicotine more quickly and for a short amount of time. It can be found in gum, lozenge, mouth spray and inhaler. Short acting NRT provides nicotine more quickly and for a short amount of time. Some types of short acting NRT can be used in a cut down to quit method. Speak with a pharmacist for details on how to do this.

Common side effects of short acting NRT are hiccups, upset stomach and throat irritation. Reduce side effects by following the directions closely.

Watch these "How to" videos:

Prescription medications

Bupropion (Zyban) comes in pill form and does not contain nicotine. It helps to reduce nicotine withdrawal and cravings, and you start taking it before your quit date. Your health care provider will advise how long you should take it and the dose you require.

Common side effects of Bupropion (Zyban) are dry mouth and trouble sleeping. Speak with your health care provider if you experience any side effects and ways to manage or reduce them.

Varenicline (Champix) comes in pill form and does not contain nicotine. It reduces the pleasurable effects of smoking, reduces cravings and is started before your quit date. Your health care provider will advise how long you should take it and the dose you require.

Common side effects of Varenicline (Champix) are nausea/vomiting, abnormal dreams, intestinal disturbance and less commonly mood changes.Speak with your health care provider if you experience any side effects and about ways to manage or reduce them.

 

To find out if you are eligible for quit smoking medications at no cost, view ”Where to get cost-free medication”.

Quitting smoking,quit smoking,smoking,quitting,stop smoking,tobacco,smoking cessation,nicotine patch,nicotine replacement,nicotine withdrawal The Regional Municipality of York en-US

Where to get cost-free medication


Smoking Cessation Resources

These resources list local smoking cessation services. All listed services are provided at no cost, although some have eligibility requirements.
Cost-Free Tobacco Intervention Services in York Region

STOP on the Road

York Region Public Health hosts the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health’s Smoking Treatment for Ontario Patients (STOP) on the Road program, which provides nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) at local community workshops for Ontarians who wish to quit smoking.

Upcoming workshops are posted in the Start your quit with Stop on the Road section above.

Public Health Nurses offer workshop participants five weeks of NRT patches at no cost and helpful information on quitting smoking. Pre-registration is required to make sure you are eligible and space is limited. Those interested in participating may call 1-877-464-9675 ext. 73052.

For Stop on the Road workshops throughout Ontario visit www.stopstudy.ca

Vaughan Community Health Centre STOP Program

Any York Region resident may be eligible to receive up to 26 weeks of nicotine replacement therapy and counselling as part of the Vaughan Community Health Centre’s Smoking Treatment for Ontario Patients (STOP) program in partnership with the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health. For more information and to register call: 905-303-8490

The Tobacco Addiction Recovery Program (TARP)

The Tobacco Addiction Recovery Program is a smoking cessation program for individuals with a mental health diagnosis. It is offered for ten to twelve weeks in a group setting at various locations and includes nicotine replacement therapy. Pre-registration is required to ensure eligibility and space is limited. Call 905.967.0357 ext. 245.  

Patients of Participating Family Health Teams, Community Health Centres, Nurse Practitioner Led Clinics and Addictions Agencies offering the STOP program

If your health care practitioner is part of one of these organizations, you may be eligible to receive up to 26 weeks of nicotine replacement therapy and counselling as part of the Smoking Treatment for Ontario Patients (STOP) program in partnership with the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health.

  • Georgina Nurse Practitioner Led Clinic
  • Southlake Academic Family Health Team
  • Newmarket-Aurora Family Health Team
  • Carefirst Family Health Team in Richmond Hill
  • Markham Family Health Team
  • Health For All Family Health Team in Markham
  • Woodbridge Family Health Team
  • Addiction Services for York Region
  • Vaughan Community Health Centre

Leave the Pack Behind

Leave The Pack Behind is a program funded by the Province of Ontario that offers young adults 18 to29 years of age quit smoking resources and support at no cost. Qualifying young adults may also receive eight-weeks of free nicotine replacement therapy.

The Health Canada Non-Insured Health Benefits (NIHB) Program

Provides First Nations and Inuit clients up to 3 courses of nicotine replacement therapy treatment over a 12-month period.  Zyban and Champix are also available. Speak to your pharmacist for more information.

Ontario Drug Benefit Program

The Ontario Drug Benefit Program (ODBP) covers one 12-week treatment of stop smoking medication (bupropion or varenicline) once a year. Talk to your health care provider about getting a prescription. Some pharmacists may also be able to prescribe quit smoking prescription medications and also provide quit smoking counselling for those who receive ODB. For more information, talk to your pharmacist or visit the Pharmacy Smoking Cessation Program.

Private Health Insurance Benefits

Those who receive private health insurance benefits through their workplace may be eligible for cost-free smoking cessation medications and support. Call your insurance provider for more information.

The Regional Municipality of York en-US

For Health and Social Service Providers

Brief interventions from a health care practitioner along with quit smoking medications including nicotine replacement therapy, varenicline or bupropion can increase the chances of quitting success.

While quitting tobacco use provides the greatest health benefits over time, not all patients are ready or have the confidence to quit. Therefore, exploring the feasibility of cutting down tobacco use gradually over time is a recommended strategy as an alternative to abruptly quitting on a set date. This may help to build the patient’s confidence and motivation to eventually quit.

Certain stop smoking medications can be used to support quitting abruptly, smoking reduction or cutting down towards quitting.

For patients who are not yet ready to make any changes, encouraging the use of NRT as required to see whether their tobacco use naturally decreases without the pressure to set a quit date could be a helpful strategy. This might include wearing the patch to see if it leads to smoking less or using short acting NRT occasionally when the urge to smoke arises.

Varenicline can also be used to help the patient gradually cut-down over time.

Source: CMAJ Medical Journal

Use “The Three A’s Brief Intervention”

Two thirds of individuals who smoke want to quit in the next six months. Patients expect their health care providers to ask them about their tobacco use. Without intervention, quit rates range from two to three per cent per year but brief intervention alone can increase quit rates by another one to three per cent every year. It only takes one to three minutes to:

Ask about tobacco use.

  • If your patient uses tobacco, ask about whether they have thought about or are currently thinking about quitting

Advise patients that not using tobacco is the most important thing they can do to improve or maintain their health.

  • Talk to the patient about the health benefits of quitting in the short, medium and long term

Arrange support and offer resources for quitting. NRT or prescription medications can be recommended if appropriate to help the patient quit or cut down. Arrange for follow-up and/or refer to Smokers’ Helpline (1-877-513-5333) for additional counselling and support.

Measuring Success

Quit rates are not the only measure of success in stop-smoking interventions.

The process of quitting is significant.

Slips and relapses are normal.

Success is:

  • Patients reflecting on why they smoke, their health and the health of those around them
  • Making a quit plan
  • Cutting down to quit (gradually reducing smoking or tobacco use before stopping)
  • Readiness to make another quit attempt

Practitioner Resources:

York Region Care Pathway for Cost-free Smoking Cessation options - York Region Public Health has created smoking cessation resources for health and social service providers to connect patients with smoking cessation services locally. All listed services are provided at no-cost, although some have eligibility requirements.

For tools and resources about tobacco cessation for healthcare providers visit: www.youcanmakeithappen.ca

Quitting smoking,quit smoking,smoking,quitting,stop smoking,tobacco,smoking cessation,four A’s,4 A’s,patients,medical professionals,nicotine patch,nicotine replacement,nicotine withdrawal The Regional Municipality of York en-US




Related Resources

External Links


Quitting smoking,quit smoking,smoking,quitting,stop smoking,tobacco,smoking cessation,four A’s,three As,4 A’s,3 As,nicotine patch,nicotine replacement,nicotine withdrawal,second-hand smoke,third-hand smoke The Regional Municipality of York en-US A calendar with a broken cigarette and the text Quit Today! Quitting Smoking Quitting smoking can be hard, but it is possible. Learn about the benefits of quitting smoking, where to get help and about protection from second- and third-hand smoke.

News and Social Media

Actions
Loading...

Campaigns and Projects

Actions
Loading...

Contact Us

  • Health Connection

  • 1-800-361-5653


  • Accessibility

    Accessible formats or communication supports are available upon request

Quitting smoking,quit smoking,smoking,quitting,stop smoking,tobacco,smoking cessation,four A’s,three As,4 A’s,3 As,nicotine patch,nicotine replacement,nicotine withdrawal,second-hand smoke,third-hand smoke
url of logo image en-US The Regional Municipality of York Contact Us

Events Calendar


  • More events