The Regional Municipality Of York

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Vaughan 2020 Construction Projects

The Regional Municipality of York is improving regional roads in the City of Vaughan to accommodate population growth, help to improve traffic flow, extend the life of roads and bridges, and enhance safety for pedestrians and cyclists. In partnership with the City of Vaughan, we are investing and making transportation improvements a priority, to continue to provide a safe and reliable road network that benefits all users.

We understand that continued construction and the traffic delays caused by this work is frustrating for residents living in these areas. We regularly analyze and review traveller data for each road project to determine the best options to ease traffic delays during construction. We care about our communities and are committed to delivering transportation improvements safely, while minimizing disruptions as best as possible. We’re building, reconstructing and repairing regional roads for you, our communities and the future of the City of Vaughan.  

To support the growing communities in Vaughan, construction is planned for over 20 locations in the next five years. These projects will include:

  • Road reconstruction and widening
  • New transit terminal connecting to the new Cortellucci Vaughan Hospital
  • Connections to the new 427 Highway extension expected in 2021
  • Intersection upgrades and improvements to enhance traffic operations
  • Pavement repair, preservation and rehabilitation

photo of Major Mackenzie Drive Culvert completed Project and Major Mackenzie Drive between Pine Valley Drive and Weston Road completed project.

Graphic map of road construction projects in Vaughan 2020. For a detailed description please see the table below or contact 1 877 464 9675 extension 75923.

View high resolution PDF of 2020 – 2025 Vaughan Construction Projects (developed for print purposes only)

View our interactive map of all York Region’s projects by visiting the Road Construction Schedule page.

2020-2021

Road About Date Traveller Impact
2. Major Mackenzie Drive from Highway 427 to Islington Avenue Road widening from two to six lanes 2018 to 2021 Temporary lane reductions lane reductions may be required to facilitate construction

3. Major Mackenzie Drive from Islington Avenue to Pine Valley Drive Road widening from two to six lanes Summer 2019 to fall 2021 Temporary lane reductions between 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

4. Rutherford Road from Jane Street to Westburne Drive Road widening from four to six lanes Spring 2021 to spring 2023 Off-peak lane reductions are required to facilitate construction between 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. to 6:30 a.m.

5. Major Mackenzie Drive from Highway 50 to Highway 427

Road widening from four to six lanes May 2020 to
late 2020
Temporary lane reductions between 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

6. Major Mackenzie from Highway 400 to Jane Street Road widening from four to six lanes October 2020 to late 2022 Off-peak lane reductions between 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Night work with lane reduction may be required from 8 p.m. to 6 a.m.

7. Highway 27 Canadian Pacific Rail Bridge Notice of Temporary Road Closure
Bridge and roadway improvements
December 2019 to spring 2022 Southbound lanes may reduce to one lane between 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Northbound lanes may reduce to one lane between 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.

15. Keele Street Bridge, north of Teston Road Bridge rehabilitation Fall 2019 to summer 2020 Complete
16. Major Mackenzie Drive from Dufferin to Bathurst Roadway resurfacing April 2020 to fall 2020 Complete

17. Highway 7 between Highway 27 to Islington Avenue Roadway resurfacing Late August 2020 to late fall 2020 Temporary lane reductions between 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. and 8 p.m. to 7 a.m.

18. Islington Avenue between Steeles Avenue and Highway 7 Roadway resurfacing Late August 2020 to late fall 2020 Temporary lane reductions between 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. and 8 p.m. to 7 a.m.

19. Major Mackenzie Drive at Vaughan City Hall Intersection Improvements September 2020 to December 2020 Off-peak lane reductions between 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
21. Rutherford Road from Westburne Drive to Peter Rupert Avenue*

Rutherford GO Station Improvements 2019 to 2022 Temporary lane reductions between 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
22. Highway 427 Extension from Finch Street to Major Mackenzie Drive*

Highway 427 extension 2019 to 2025 Visit LINK427 for more information
23. Keele Street from Highway 7 to Langstaff Road*

Watermain replacement 2020 Visit City of Vaughan for more information
24. Major Mackenzie Drive* York Region Transit Terminal 2020 Visit York Region Transit for more information
25. Major Mackenzie Drive* Cortellucci Vaughan Hospital Project Opening early 2021

Visit the Mackenzie Health website for more information

26. Steeles Avenue from Jane Street to Dufferin Street*

Environmental Services Wastewater project (York Region) 2020 to 2021 Visit York Region’s Water and Wastewater Construction Project page for more information

*These projects are being led by another group within York Region or by an external partner

For projects beyond 2020 please visit our Road Construction Schedule page.

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Frequently Asked Questions

Why are these improvements taking place?

  • York Regional Council continues to invest and make transportation improvements a priority, outlined in the 10-year capital plan
  • Roads are identified for improvements for a variety of reasons including enhancing safety for pedestrians and cyclists, managing assets in a state of good repair and improving traffic flow to accommodate population growth by adding new lanes or creating new roads
  • To support the growing communities in Vaughan, construction is planned for over 20 locations in the next five years. These projects will include:
    • Road reconstruction and widening
    • New transit terminal connecting to the new Major Mackenzie Hospital
    • Connections to the new 427 Highway extension expected in 2021
    • Intersection upgrades and improvements to enhance traffic operations
    • Pavement repair, preservation and rehabilitation
  • As York Region’s population and businesses grow, public roads are accommodating more travellers, goods and services
    • Vaughan’s population is forecasted to grow from 249,300 in 2006 to 416,600 by 2031
    • Vaughan’s employment is forecasted to grow from 162,200 jobs in 2006 to 266,100 jobs by 2031 
    • The travel growth in the area (daily trips to and from Vaughan) has grown from 727,900 in 2006 to 895,400 in 2016, a 23% increase
  • By expanding or upgrading infrastructure, we are ensuring we meet the needs of our growing communities now, rather than waiting until we run out of capacity

Why is this construction happening all at once?

  • York Region has a 10-year Capital Plan which dictates infrastructure projects across the Region. Capital projects are undertaken to improve the community for all York Region residents
  • While serving growth remains important, capital spending also focuses on asset management to extend the life of assets, such as roads and bridges, and reduce total costs over their life cycle. Over the next 10 years, $1.4 billion will go to rehabilitating and replacing existing assets. These investments help ensure that assets are in a state of good repair for current and future residents
  • To maximize as much work as possible, the majority of construction projects are completed in the warmer months when the ground is not frozen and temperatures for mixing and laying asphalt is ideal and traffic volumes are lower
  • Construction involving work near environmentally sensitive areas can only take place between July 1 and September 15 due to strict environmental restrictions. Projects that will fall into this narrow window include: 
    • When a project is working within a water course
    • Culvert replacement(s)
    • A need to protect the fish habitat in the area
Does York Region coordinate with other projects happening in the area?
  • The Region does coordinate with our local towns/cities, developers, utility companies and other agencies (such as Metrolinx) to minimize the disruption to residents and motorists as much as possible
  • Due to the complexity and timing requirements of certain projects, it is sometimes not possible to avoid construction on adjacent or parallel roads

How much work goes in to preparing road projects for construction?

  • It takes 8 to 10 years to deliver major road projects. Environmental assessment study, road design, property acquisition, utility relocation and permits all have to be completed before construction can begin. Coordinating work with our partners, including ministries, local cities and towns, conservation authorities, utility companies and developers is important to ensure disruption to travellers and the community is minimized.


What are the safety measures in place and how is safety considered?

  • York Region conducts routine inspections of all its structures and determines the need for repair to ensure safer travel for all users
  • When construction projects are being planned and implemented, residents, businesses, travellers and the environment are all taken into consideration
  • During the design phase of a construction project, the Region ensures we are meeting Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act requirements and the needs of all users within our transportation network
  • York Region reviews hundreds of intersections each year and studies are completed to consider traffic and pedestrian volumes, future development, delay and collision history
  • A Traffic Safety Report is produced each year to provide an understanding of road safety trends on Regional roads. This report supports the planning and execution of coordinated law enforcement, road safety improvements and public education campaigns for travellers in York Region. Reports can be viewed here
  • Signage is put in place around a construction area to communicate to travellers what is going on and how to travel safely through the work zone

How are you trying to minimize travel impacts?

  • York Region reviews the corridor of each project to determine how to mitigate traffic delays during construction. Night work, 24-hour shifts and other off-peak hour work is considered for each project to minimize the impact on travellers
  • Off-peak hours are normally between 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. These hours may be modified for each project, depending on the scope of the project, the corridor and construction schedule. There are also exceptions for emergency or urgent projects

Why don’t all projects utilize night work?

  • Overnight work is not always an option in a construction project due to the following:
    • In rural environments, there are very limited street lights providing illumination of the road and construction during low light visibility can be a safety issue for workers
    • Night time driving can limit motorist’s visibility causing a potential safety hazard for a motorist and workers on some sites
    • Night time construction is unsafe for a contractor utilizing heavy machinery for structural work due to lack of visibility
    • Depending on the location, a construction site could be adjacent to resident areas and noise By-law restrictions are in place to limit construction during evening hours

How can a construction project get delayed?

  • Weather is a large factor in delaying a construction project
    • To conduct paving work, weather conditions have to be clear, the surface has to be dry and above a specified temperature depending on the type of asphalt being used
  • Unknown factors coming into play
    • During excavation, contaminated soil could be uncovered and would need to be disposed of at an approved and registered waste disposal site, capable of receiving hazardous and waste material, as authorized under Part V of the Environmental Protection Act

How these improvements benefit you

  • Travellers will benefit from the widened Major Mackenzie Drive corridor east of Highway 400, helping to alleviate congestion in this area
  • A new transit terminal and elevator pavilion, which will help connect travellers with the new hospital set to open along Major Mackenzie Drive
  • With road widening projects, travellers will get extra lanes of the roadway in an otherwise traffic heavy area, easing congestion
  • Rehabilitating our roads ensures a safer commute for all road users
  • Cycling and walking facilities provide new opportunities for cyclists and commuters to use active forms of transportation to explore York Region. Bicycle lanes aid in connecting the larger commuter and leisure cycling network
  • Improving the transportation network in Vaughan with more transit facilities
  • Connections to the new 427 Highway extension

How are residents impacted by the project being informed?

  • To help travellers plan ahead during road construction, we install advance signage, post messages on social media and our website, and distribute notices
  • Travellers are encouraged to use traffic and navigation tools. York Region provides real-time traffic and road information in open data, used by many app developers
  • Find us on social media: @YorkRegionGovt
  • Visit us on york.ca/roadconstruction or york.ca/roadclosures

Why are you replacing bridges?

  • The average service life of a bridge is 75 years
  • York Region conducts routine inspections of all its structures to determine if a bridge is in need to be reconstructed or replaced to ensure safer travel for all users

What is a culvert?

  • A culvert is a tunnel or crossing located under a road. It can be built to transport either water, people or animals
  • York Region conducts routine inspections of all its structures to determine if culverts need to be replaced to ensure safer travel for all users

Tree removal, disposal and replacement

  • Trees may be removed to accommodate a construction project. Every tree within the construction zone is inventoried and tree protection fencing is installed to protect the trees not designated for removal
  • Trees that are removed will be replaced at approximately a 3:1 ratio with new trees. The Region will plant as many trees as possible within the existing road allowance and the rest will be replaced on other Region or TRCA land. The trees being removed are utilized for lumber, firewood or bedding material at farms
  • At the end of construction, a variety of trees and shrubs are planted by York Region in compensation for the trees that had to be removed

COVID-19 and construction projects

  • Construction projects have continued since the beginning of the pandemic, as the province has identified construction as an essential service
  • Increased sanitation and physical distancing are being practiced on all Regional construction sites. All contractors are following the Provincial government’s guidance in regards to construction workers health and safety during COVID-19.
  • York Region has requested updated health and safety plans recognizing COVID-19 from all contractors
  • Delays to construction may be affected by COVID-19 and Public Health guidelines. York Region will provide advanced notice whenever possible

Regional Road improvements completed in 2019

  • We’re out in the community every year making improvements to our roadway in our nine municipalities. Our 2019 improvements include:
    • Opening the SmartVMC, connecting travellers to the TTC Line One Subway, the first subway extending into York Region
      • Travellers have used the Line 1 subway extension to Vaughan Metropolitan Centre for three million trips since the opening in 2017, with many transferring between the subway and YRT service
    • Improvements to the road network across York Region including:
      • 18 lane-kilometres of new roadway added through road widening and intersection improvements
      • 178 lane kilometres of asphalt rehabilitation and preservation
      • 30 upgraded intersections; improvements to selected intersections may include:  
        • A new traffic signal at the intersection
        • Modifications to current traffic signals to meet AODA requirements, including replacing the standard push buttons with Audible Pedestrian Signals and imbedding tactile walking surface indicators into the concrete ramps
        • Installing pedestrian crosswalks
        • Upgrading traffic signal equipment to meet current standards
    • Adding 40 Bluetooth sensors, giving travellers up-to-date traffic flow information, bringing the total to 386
    • Upgrading 110 traffic signals to enable second-by-second monitoring and making timing adjustments to keep travellers moving efficiently
    • Expanding and improving the transit fleet of roughly 570 buses to better serve customers by adding 11 new replacement buses, and completing mid-life overhauls on 37 other buses to extend their service life by six years

Safety tips for motorists travelling through construction zones

Many construction workers are injured or killed each year when working on roads. When driving through construction zones motorists must:

  • Slow down early when approaching construction zones
  • Be patient and obey signs and signal persons
  • Merge well in advance when lanes are being funnelled down
  • Avoid lane changes, give yourself extra following space and be ready to stop
  • Do not speed up quickly when leaving construction zones
  • Do not pass construction vehicles when their amber lights are flashing
  • Plan ahead and expect delays

Visit our Traffic Safety Program page for more safety tips.  

Safety tips for pedestrians and cyclists through construction zones

  • It is very important to obey ALL work zone signs, workers and pavement markings
  • Watch where you are going.  Your primary responsibility is go through the work zone as safely as you can
  • Orange Work Zone Signs – these signs communicate to drivers, pedestrians and cyclists what is going on and how to travel safely through the work zone. They can also indicate that a sidewalk is closed and that a detour must be taken
  • Pavement Markings –painted or taped lines on the pavement separate car travel lanes and can also indicate pedestrian and cyclist paths
  • During construction, some sidewalks may be closed. Pedestrians may be required to move to the other side of the road or to a temporary pedestrian walkway
  • Use designated pedestrian crosswalks and traffic lights to cross the street before reaching a construction zone and DO NOT cross in the middle of the road
  • Please DO NOT walk on the roadway beside the barriers

Please be alert and aware of your surroundings when travelling near construction areas

Visit our Traffic Safety Program page for more safety tips.  

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Contact Information

For contact information and more details on improvements, please visit each individual project page.

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Related Resources

Road Construction Schedule

Road Closures


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